Podcasts

Podcast (audio library):

Podcast are ongoing collection audio speeches, interviews and lectures of black elders, professionals, young people and others who are invested in our community. It was conceived as learning tool of the black experience.

The purpose of the podcast is to:

  • Use the audio “Theater of the Mind” to convey blackness.
  • Serve as a voice for our views, advice, affirmations and critique.
  • Enhance existing text articles in our website.
  • Support the oral traditions that are the trademark of black people.

RSS Feeds:

As the rollout of coronavirus vaccines unfolds, one big challenge for public health officials has been the skepticism many Black people have toward the vaccine. One notorious medical study — the Tuskegee experiment — has been cited as a reason. But should it be?

Marcus Garvey was an immigrant, a firebrand, a businessman. He was viewed with deep suspicion by the civil rights establishment. He would also become one of the most famous and powerful Black visionaries of the 20th century. Our play-cousins at NPR’s Throughline podcast went deep on how he became the towering (and often misunderstood) figure that he is.

The Trump administration is coming to a close, but which elements of the Trump era are here to stay? We spoke to NPR’s White House reporter, Ayesha Rascoe, about where we were when Donald Trump took office — and what he’s left behind.

If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s that history informs every aspect of our present. So today we’re bringing you an episode of NPR’s history podcast, Throughline. It gets into some of the most urgent lessons we can learn from James Baldwin, whose life and writing illuminate so much about what it would really mean for the United States to reckon with its race problem.

Guns. They’re as American as apple pie. They represent independence and self-reliance. But … not so much if you’re Black. On this episode, we’re getting into the complicated history of Black gun ownership and what it has to tell us about our present moment.

For the first time in election history, Latinos are projected to be the second-largest voting demographic in the country. The reason? Gen Z Latinx voters, many of whom are casting a ballot for the first time in 2020. So we asked a bunch of them: Who do you plan to vote for? What issues do you care about? And what do you want the rest of the country to know about you?


The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated issues that disproportionately affect women. So on this episode, we’re talking to Mikki Kendall — author of the new book, Hood Feminism — about what on-the-ground feminism practiced by women of color can teach us that the mainstream feminist movement has forgotten.


It’s one of the thorniest questions in any theoretical plan for reparations for black people: Who should get them? On this episode, we dig into some ideas about which black people should and shouldn’t receive a payout — which one expert estimates would cost at least $10 trillion.


The video is horrific, and the brutality is stark. But that was the case in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014 and Minnesota in 2016. This time, though, white people are out in the streets in big numbers, and books such as “So You Want to Talk About Race” and “How to Be an Antiracist” top the bestseller lists. So we asked some white people: What’s different this time?

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Poetry Corner

You are disdainful and magnificant-- Your perfect body and your pompous gait, Your dark eyes flashing solemnly with hate, Small wonder that you are incompetent To imitate those whom you so despise-- Your sholders... SONNET TO A NEGRO IN HARLEM by Helene Johnson
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