Joel Augustus Rogers, Renaissance Man


Joel A. Rogers
Date: 
Thu, 1883-09-06

Joel Augustus Rogers was born on this date in 1883. He was an African American writer, lecturer, anthropologist, historian, journalist, and publisher.

Rogers was from Negril, Jamaica, where his father was a small-town schoolteacher. In 1906, Rogers moved to Chicago but spent most of his life in Harlem, New York. Rogers had known Marcus Garvey in Jamaica and in 1917, he became a naturalized U.S. citizen. In 1923, he covered the Marcus Garvey trial, he wrote for the Universal Negro Improvement Associations weekly newspaper, the Negro World, and he lectured to local UNIA chapters. Rogers also researched the global history of African people. In 1925 he went to Europe for research and analyses in their libraries and museums.

In 1927, he returned to Europe for research and traveled to North Africa during the same period. Between 1935 and 1936, he researched in Egypt and Sudan. At this time he worked as a correspondent for the New York Amsterdam News. He attended the coronation of Haile Selassie I, who presented him with the Coronation Medal.

Rogers' organizational affiliations included the Paris Society of Anthropology, the American Geographical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Academy of Political Science.

For 50 years, Rogers investigated and reported the accomplishments of ancient and contemporary African people, contributing to such publications as The Crisis, American Mercury, the Messenger, The Negro World, Pittsburgh Courier, and Survey Graphic. When publishing houses refused to publish his works, Rogers published them himself.

Rogers was the first Black war correspondent. He became a scholar unparalleled in assembling information about African people, and probably did more to popularize African history than any single writer of the 20th century. Rogers wrote and published at least 16 books and pamphlets covering the entire spectrum of the global African community, from ancient and modern Africa, to Asia, Australia, the South Pacific, Europe, and the Western Hemisphere.

His most acclaimed works are "From Superman to Man," his first book, published in 1917; "One-Hundred Amazing Facts About the Negro," "The Real Facts About Ethiopia," "Sex and Race," "Nature Knows No Color-Line," and "The World's Great Men of Color."

Joel Augustus Rogers died in 1966.

Reference:
100 Amazing Facts about the Negro with Complete Proof
Copyright, 1934
Publisher: Helga Rogers
Refised in the 1940's and published in 1957
ISBN: 0960229477

To Become an Anthropologist

Person / name: 

Rogers, Joel Augustus

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