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Sun, 08.05.1928

Atlanta Daily World founded

*This date marks the founding of the Atlanta Daily World in 1928.

William Alexander Scott II, age 26, founded the company, one of the most early successful Black daily newspaper in the United States.
When The Daily World was founded there was only one other Black paper in the Atlanta area, The Atlanta Independent, which shut down in 1933. Scott hired agents to solicit subscriptions door-to door and used newsboys, and by 1930, the Atlanta Daily World was one of the most widely circulated Black newspapers in the Deep South. The Atlanta Daily World became a daily newspaper in 1932. On February 4, 1934, William Alexander Scott was shot and killed while walking from his garage.  No one was ever convicted of his murder.

His brother, Cornelius Adolphus Scott, subsequently became the head of The Daily World. Under his leadership, the newspaper adopted a more conservative, Republican position, reflecting C. A. Scott's political views. The Atlanta Daily World was one of the first newspapers to report on "Black on Black" crimes. It also encouraged African- Americans to patronize Black owned businesses and, in the 1940s, sponsored voter registration efforts. During the Civil Rights era, The Daily World was criticized for not supporting sit-ins staged at several white-owned restaurants in downtown Atlanta.

The Atlanta Daily World remained in the hands of one family, the Scotts, until its purchase in 2012 by Real Times Media.  Many prominent journalists began their careers at there.  The Atlanta Daily World now publishes once a week, on Thursdays, and updates news and information on a daily basis via the newspaper's website.

Reference:
Atlanta Daily World

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