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Sat, 08.10.1929

Eleanora Green, Mathematician born

Eleanora Green

*Eleanor Green was born this date in 1929. She is a retired Black mathematician and educator.  

From Norfolk, VA she was one of six children of Lillian Vaughn Green a former domestic worker, and George Herbert Green, a postal letter carrier. Though neither of her parents attended college they raised all six of their children to become college graduates.

After H. S. graduation in 1945, she attended Howard University and earned a B. S. in math (1949), and an M. S. (1950) majoring in mathematics. Green taught for two years at her high school (Booker T. Washington High School). In 1953 Green married Edward Dawley, Jr. and gave birth to her first son. Two years later after the birth of her second son, she became an instructor at Hampton Institute (Now University). There, she also furthered her graduate work against the segregated policies of the University of Virginia and other Virginia schools.

In 1962, she left Hampton with her young children for Syracuse New York, where she supported her family while pursuing graduate work at Syracuse University. Green earned her Ph.D. from Syracuse University in 1966. In 1967 she came back to Pennsylvania as Professor and Math Department chair at Hampton Institute. One year later she became Professor and Chair of the Mathematics Department at Norfolk State University.

Jones retired as professor emeritus from Norfolk University in 2003. She served on the Committee for Opportunities for Underrepresented Minorities of the American Mathematical Society, the Executive board of the Association for Women in Mathematics and the Board of Governors for the Mathematical Association of America. Jones also held the position of vice president of the National Association of Mathematicians. She raised three sons, Everett B. Jones, Edward A. Dawley and the late Herbert G. Dawley. 

To Become a Mathematician

Reference:

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