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Sun, 09.28.1947

Harold Dow, TV Journalist born

Harold Dow

*Harold Dow was born on this date in 1947. He was a Black television news journalist.

Harold Dow was born in Hackensack, New Jersey. He graduated from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and was a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.  He was the first Black news journalist on television in the state of Nebraska as a reporter, co-anchor, and talk-show host for KETV-TV in Omaha, Nebraska. From there Dow anchored and reported at Theta Cable TV in Santa Monica, California.

He was also a news anchor for WPAT Radio in Paterson, New Jersey.   Dow joined CBS News in 1972, first as a broadcast associate, then as a correspondent with their Los Angeles Bureau while with KCOP-TV. Dow reported on the return of POWs from Vietnam and the kidnapping of Patricia Hearst, with whom he had an exclusive interview in December 1976. Prior to his work with 48 Hours, Dow was a correspondent for the CBS News magazine Street Stories and had reported for the CBS Evening News and CBS News Sunday Morning since the early 1970s.

In 1990, Dow became a correspondent for the CBS TV investigative news series 48 Hours. In January 1988. He had been a contributing correspondent for 48 Hours on Crack Street, the critically acclaimed 1986 documentary that led to the single-topic weekly news magazine. Dow conducted the first network interview for 48 Hours with O. J. Simpson following the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

A resident of Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, Harold Dow died from complications of asthma on August 21, 2010, at a New Jersey hospital.  He was married to Kathy Dow. They had three children; Danica, Joelle, David.

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